ALBUM REVIEW: THE O’REILLYS AND THE PADDYHATS- ‘Dogs on the Leash’ (2020)

Germany and Celtic-Punk go together like Guinness and chips and there’s no better purveyors there than the wonderful O’Reillys And The Paddyhats. Our man Anto Morra runs the critical rule over their enjoyable fourth album.

This record opens with the title track, which is a craic’r and appears to have it all, just what Dr Folk Punk ordered. A song written from the perspective of those in charge wanting to keep the people drunk, drugged up, calm, quiet and brilliantly concluding

‘We won’t back off, We will free ourselves from the leash’.

“Here it goes again” levels the class playing field with the clever observation that no matter how financially wealthy or poor, we all go through the motions of endless struggle or celebration, to the point at which it becomes mundane. So the chorus wisely informs us to ‘Get out of your castle get out of your shack, It’s not Groundhog Day so leave the bloody track’ and all with a great punky reggae party feel.

An exquisite fiddle and banjo leads us into “James Brian” for a bit of Celtic mysticism. The story of a man that mysteriously vanishes from the bog because he worked into the night, this is a great arrangement with hints of klezmer and The Levellers springing to mind at times.

“Captain Without A Ship” kicks of with a brilliant twinned guitar harmony part in the style of Thin Lizzy, continues to rock out the middle 8, and ventures into Status Quo playing Oi -if you can imagine that! After another rousing chorus, we are treated to a fine bit of plank spanking from Jan, that’s not unlike the great solos of Kane Roberts on Alice Cooper’s Constrictor album.

“Millions” ‘How many millions do you need to say that you succeed?’ an appealing sentiment, big chorus with a Klezmer crescendo- what more do you need? Sounds like a recipe for success to me.

“Ferryman” is a lament that if it was wearing a different outfit could be described as a power ballad, the arrangement is perfection. Thankfully, because Franz does not sing like Bruce Dickenson, it works beautifully with the low whistle and other trad instruments, which keep it flowing, grounded and not at all laboured.

“From Dublin To Moscow” is a superb tale of five courageous 17th century adventurers whose only fear is running out of beer. It is at the same time a clever doff of the hat to the Irish traditional songs, like the ‘Blarney Stone’ and ‘Star Of The County Down’, that mention many place names as comfortably possible to appeal to everyone from those places. Of course, I was delighted that London got a mention!

“Overtime Work” is just over 3 minutes of more fun than I’ve ever had doing overtime, but I think I could have spent time as a CEO of the company supplying this overtime.

The strength of “Hobo Of Mitchelstown” is the fact it can not really be compared anything, while at the same time sitting comfortably in the folk punk genre. The heavy rock guitar sound could place it, dare I say, in the folk rock genre.

“Beautiful Fear” is a terrific song, full of romantic imagery, but the humour is not far away. I feel as this is an anthem for people like myself that suffer dreadfully from FOMO (fear of missing out). This track could also be called “Beautiful Fiddle” as the solo is just spot on.

In true punk style they appear to have stolen this Bobby Sands/Gordon Lightfoot classic “Back Home In Derry” with no credits on the sleeve notes. It’s a very fine version with a different member of the band on each verse, and that enchanting fiddle playing again. The last verse is reserved the great face of the band Benny, ending with a huge chorus which without missing a beat goes seamlessly into “Shoe Shine Boy”. If you weren’t paying attention when you hit the chorus, you may think you were still back home in Derry, but this is a wonderful song about a wise shoe shine boy and an arrogant rich man. ‘Things change farewell, farewell my friend’ – “Farewell” is just a joyous closing track. ‘We are drinking lots of beer, we’re not asking our livers’ is my favourite line!

The O’Reillys and The Paddyhats succeed where so many celtic folk punk bands fail, is with the quality of singing. Franz has a great strong engaging voice, and Tim adds the aggressive rasp that is essential in punk and rock music. The song writing is intelligent, witty and at times a little comical, but never novelty or flippant- if their musicianship wasn’t top notch they would not be able to successfully execute the humour they do! This is their rockiest offering so far, but they have not lost any of their German Irish charm. Just go and buy it because it has been a joy to review.

Buy Dogs On The Leach  CD/Download- FromTheBand

Contact The O’Reillys And The Paddyhats  WebSite  Facebook  YouTube

Album Discography (Click for review)- April 2016 Seven Hearts One Soul * February 2017 Sign Of The Fighter * September 2018 Green Blood *

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London Irish, Punk Folk singer, songwriter and artist Anto Morra lives in East Anglia and is a regular performer on the Norfolk Folk Roots and acoustic music scene as well as the London Celtic Punks scene. He’s even second cousin to Morrissey!  he did a special Live Stream London Celtic Punks show on June 5th and no it wasn’t suppose to be sideways!!

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One thought on “ALBUM REVIEW: THE O’REILLYS AND THE PADDYHATS- ‘Dogs on the Leash’ (2020)

  1. The O'Reillys and the Paddyhats June 25, 2020 at 2:39 pm Reply

    Thanks for this lovely review. Cheers to Anto for writing it 🙂 Thanks to Eddie aswell! Hope to meet you all on the road again soon…

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