Tag Archives: The Waterboys

ALBUM REVIEW: THE LOGUES- ‘Comin’ of Age’ (2016)

The Logues are five culchies from Co. Tyrone who play music!

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Formed in 2006 in the sleepy small village of Castlederg (in Irish: Caisleán na Deirge, meaning ‘castle on the Derg’) in County Tyrone in the north of Ireland. It lies on the River Derg and is just across the border from County Donegal. The various members were keeping a drunken promise by having a informal jam session on St Patrick’s Day that went down so well that now ten years later it has seen the lads tour right across Ireland and Europe (and America in 2017!). The five piece folk-rock band is made up of drums, bass, acoustic guitar, mandolin, banjo, tin whistle and vocals and with plenty of talent, wit and charm too! the-logues-1They self released their debut album ‘Tough at the Bottom’ in July 2011. A semi-concept album of eleven original songs based on that great Irish activity- drinking! Part autobiographical, part satire, the album explores house parties, being in love with mentally unstable women, being a ‘culchie’ (an Irish word for country personand even the literature of Flann O’Brien. They followed this up with a bunch of single releases that kept them in the public domain receiving plenty of airplay and eventually helping them become one of Ireland’s most sought after bands. The band name is not as you probably imagined a tribute to the #1 celtic-punk band but is in fact the surname of vocalist and tin whistle player Justin Logue. The Logues did though begin by playing mainly songs from The Pogues/The Dubliners song book before taking the adventurous step to move beyond cover band status and into the realm of real music. The band have an unmistakable folk-rock sound and their music has drawn some interesting comparisons to, among others, Christy Moore, Goats Don’t Shave, The Waterboys and The Saw Doctors and they are all well deserved.

Comin’ Of Age sees The Logues at ten years old and if Tough at the Bottom was a superb, though unpolished, debut album then their follow up is certainly set to see them cross over into the big leagues. The album kicks off with ‘Absence Makes the Heart Grow Fonder’ and it’s a strong opener with the trad Irish butting up against electric guitar and making for a lovely racket. Short and sweet and over before you know it and next up is ‘Bless the Land’ which was released as a single back in August 2014.  An album standout with great vocals from all the band and a real catchy chorus. ‘Better Man’ is up next and slows it down for a lovely ballad of just vocals and acoustic guitar and banjo. The universal theme of trying to prove you can be a better person. The best celtic-punk bands can knock out a ballad or two and The Logues do it with ease while ‘I Don’t Love You at All’ is a short and sweet song lasting just over two minutes. Busting with humour and with the welcome sound of a trumpet too!

They follow this up with a cover of the Philip Phillips hit song ‘Home’. Not so much in love with this one sounding as it does like The Lumineers or one of them other ‘Posh Folk’ bands from this side of the water. I’m sure will be popular enough mind but for me it just sticks out a bit from the rest of the album.


The LP returns to Irish trad with ‘Yvonne John’ with a country/ folk/ rock romp with a song based around the mispronunciation of a brand of Dutch rolling tobacco. ‘Sirens Call’ is pure folk-rock with a loud and bombastic beat but never too far from their folky roots.


‘Fly Free’ begins with piano and was another song released as a single in the run-up to the albums release. Nice to hear a ballad that shows that their prowess as a band and even though it has no folkier touches it fits snugly into the album. After a non folky song they follow it up with the country tinged ‘Drinkin’ with God’ and the full on country themed ‘All I Want Is You’.


‘No Place Like Home’ originally appeared on that 2011 debut album but The Logues have re-recorded it and it’s slighty shorter but ten times the original with the much better production only emphasising how much better the production on that debut could have been. More of the country feel to it and great banjo and lyrics about well you don’t need me to tell you.

‘Paisley Pattern’ is banjo led and catchy enough and over fairly quickly before we get a real standout track with ‘Logan’s Lament’ and an instrumental that really shows the Bhoys can play their instruments and also know their stuff as well. Fast and furious with all the band getting stuck in it’s traditional Irish folk for now and as good as any you’ll hear.


Comin’ Of Age comes to an end with ‘I’m on Fire’ and yeah it’s The Boss tune and while it may seem a bit sad to say the album standout track is a cover please don’t take it that way. All the elements of the original song are here but what The Logues have done to it is truly make it their own. An absolutely brilliant way to wrap up the album and the live version below doesn’t quite do it justice so hunt down this album just to hear ‘I’m on Fire’.

Signed to one of Ireland’s most respected music agency’s the future looks extremely bright for The Logues and with their army of fans in Ireland now beginning to extend to over here and with that American tour set to launch them in the States things couldn’t look any better for them. In the scale of celtic-punk they may not be up their with the more punkier bands but it’s loud and it’s catchy with great intelligent lyrics and a punk spirit that carries them along and means that not only do The Logues love what they do but it’s obvious to anyone listening that they love what they do. Last year it was their friends from just across the border in Donegal O’Hanlons Horsebox that took the Irish music scene (and this web zine!) by storm with their infectious brand of trad-celtic-folk-rock so only fitting that it should be a band from just down the road in 2016!

the-logues-band

The Logues L-R: Logan MacCool- Vocals, Tin Whistle * Kiel Cathers- Vocals, Acoustic Guitar * Chris Speer- Banjo * Darrell Nelson- Drums * Jesse Darragh- Bass, Keyboards

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ALBUM REVIEW: THE CLAN- ‘All In The Name Of Folk’ (2016)

The Clan. As influenced by AC/DC , punk rock and traditional Irish folk music!

The Clan

We have now been at this for so long that we have recently been doing album reviews of bands that we have already featured before and The Clan are one of those bands. Back in December 2014 we reviewed  (here) their superb self-titled debut album and boy did we rave on and on about how good it was! Well this is the follow up to that and we can confirm that it is indeed equally good, if not better!

Clan

The Clan hail from the small town of Muggiò in the province of Lombardy in the north of Italy and have only been together since 2013. Maybe its a Catholic thing but their has always been a good relationship between the Irish and the Italians. I can’t speak for America (maybe one of our US readers can fill us in but I did hear their was a lot inter-marriage between us) but here in England we got on fine. A couple of my best mates at Catholic school were Italians and they were big Celtic fans too. Their has always been a lot of traffic between Ireland and Italy and so I suppose it’s only natural that some Italians will find solace in Irish music. It’s also clear that Italy’s top celtic bands like The Clan, Kitchen Implosion, Dirty Artichokes and Uncle Bard And The Dirty Bastards all have that same deep love for Ireland and it’s culture and musical traditions.

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All In The Name Of Folk hit the streets the day after this years St Patrick’s Day on the 18 March which as many of you I’m sure will know it’s the a day not particularly well known to many Irish people! It came out on OnAirish Records and lasts nearly fifty minutes and where as their debut album was a straight up 50/50 mix of traditional folk covers and originals I am especially glad to report that apart from one brilliantly amazing cover these are all The Clan’s own songs.

The album begins with the sound of an ocean in ‘Overture’ which features the first of their many guests, the self taught bagpiper and whistle player, Iain Alexander Marr of The Sidh. A highly original and innovative Italian band whose combination of contemporary and electronic celtic music has led to plaudits galore. It’s a slow dirge with military style drumming that soon explodes into The Clan’s signature tune ‘Folk ‘N’ Roll’ where Iain again guests on the pipes and it’s pure 110% celtic-punk-rock!!! Utterly brilliant with a tonne and a half of energy that bursts out the speakers at you. They follow this up with ‘Second Chances’ and we are joined by fiddle and banjo and with no let up at all with Angel Rock’s vocals shining through. ‘Let Me Go’ features good mate of the band and TV and radio personality and rock star Andrea Rock and again it comes off brilliantly. ‘Jenny Porter’ was the first song they released to the world off the album via the superb video below. An absolute blinder and it has to be said that The Clan do make bloody good videos. Get yourself a beer and a pack of biscuits and be sure to check out their YouTube channel below and treat yourselves.

I don’t have a clue who Jenny Porter (bar that she’s the “queen of the pub”) is but she must be well chuffed to have such a kick-ass song written about her. The album continues with the instrumental ‘Whole Lotta Jig’ featuring one of Italy’s foremost flutists and expert Irish flute player Tommaso Tornielli. The song is yer proper authentic Irish folk jig that if I hadn’t just told you you’d have never have guessed it was played by Italians. ‘Irish Sky’ has a Poguesy feel to it led as it is by the tin whistle while ‘Angel of the Sea’ is one of those swirling around on the dance floor moments with yer arms wrapped around friends and foe alike while yer beer spills down someone’s back and grand it is too. It features Francesco Moneti fiddle player of the amazing Modena City Ramblers and has a seriously good Waterboys sound to it. ‘Horns up and Fight’ turns the volume up again kicking off with the pipes and the fastest/punkiest song on the album is heading yer way. ‘Ulysses and the Siren’ keeps the speed up but is much more traditional based while ‘Reel O’Fire’ is another class instrumental featuring both Stefano Iascone and Jacopo Ventura and comes up trumps again with a trad number that is simply outstanding with the great addition of trumpet making it stand out loud and proud. It’s possibly the best song here and shows The Clan at what they do best. ‘Home of My Heart’ slows the pace down a little but still sounds perfect Clan! They save maybe not the best for last but certainly the two songs that will stand out among the majority of celtic-punk fans. ‘True Story’ featuring the #1 geezer in celtic-punk Francis McLaughlin of Aussie band The Rumjacks who need no introduction and Frankie’s dulcet tones dominate the song as per usual everything this Bhoy turns his hand is simply magnificent and finally the album comes to an end with another Aussie connection. You may heard ‘It’s a Long Way to the Top’ before especially as just recently its been all over Facebook as performed by the brilliant AC/DC on the back of a van driving down some street in Australia (check it out here). Their are bagpipes in the original and I guess we could definitely consider it celtic-rock (even celtic-punk) these days but The Clan add to it some fiddles and mandolin among the pipes and crank the rock up too making this the perfect ending to a great album. If you can please excuse my language for a moment IT FUCKING ROCKS!!!

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A fantastic album and, as others have written, a definite contender for those end of year Best Of polls. This is perhaps not ‘celtic-punk’ in as much as it is Irish-punk as their love of Irish music seeps through every pore of All In The Name Of Folk. Not a single bad track here in fact the absolute opposite. This is how celtic-punk should be played with love and respect for the past and a eye to to the future and all the time keeping it relevant for everyone from yer old folkie with a finger jammed in his ear to the young skate punker sitting in his bedroom annoying the hell out of his parents with his music. Get this album it’s far too good to miss out on!

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ALBUM REVIEW: BEYOND THE FIELDS- ‘The Falcon Lives’ (2014)

Beyond The Fields- 'The Falcon Lives (2014)

Bordered by three countries the area of Lake Constance in Switzerland is not only one of the most beautiful spots in Europe but also home to one of Europe’s hardest working celtic bands. Beyond The Fields were formed in 1998 by Swiss singer-songwriter Andre Bollier. Within a year the band had released their first record, a 3 track CD of original numbers titled ‘Home’. And that my friends was that. For the next decade or so Beyond The Fields continued to tour and play gigs until only after being harassed by fans for some new recordings they finally buckled and have come up with ‘The Falcon Lives’ only 15 years after that single!

Beyond The Fields

The Falcon Lives’ was produced by the bands drummer Eddy Sloof and I have to say that the mix is great. All the various instruments are as clear as day and all combine perfectly, capturing the live sound of the band accurately. Coming in at over 45 minutes long the album is great value and eleven of the twelve songs are the bands own compositions. That other track ‘Blue Murder’ was written by Alistair Hulett, Scots born singer of Aussie celtic-punk legends Roaring Jack. Sadly Alistair passed away back in 2010 but I’m sure he’s up there smiling proudly away at this version.

left to right Eva Wey (Fiddle) André Bollier (Vocals and Acoustic Guitar) Marcel Bollier (Bass) Uwe Schaefer (Mandolin) and Eddy Sloof (Drums and Percussion)

left to right Eva Wey (Fiddle) André Bollier (Vocals and Acoustic Guitar) Marcel Bollier (Bass) Uwe Schaefer (Mandolin) Eddy Sloof (Drums and Percussion)

The album kicks off with ‘Perfect’ and straight away its the acoustic folky side of celtic-punk that Beyond The Fields inhabit. A song about being in love with someone your friends don’t like mixes in country sounds and some absolutely amazing fiddling from Eva and straight away its bands like The Waterboys and The Saw Doctors that comes to mind. Not in any copycat way and maybe its Andre’s rasping vocals but its hugely impressive. ‘One of Those Days’ is about well one of them days you should have stayed in bed and is classic celtic-punk in the folk rock  vein of bands like the Mollys or The Tossers, though not so obviously Irish. Beyond The Fields are more of a punk folk band rather than a folk punk band if you know what I mean. ‘The Artists Song’ is a slow ballad becrying the lack of proper music these days and the plastic clones that make up the ‘industry’ these days

“who needs Britpop when we’ve got The Beatles”

‘The Canterbury Tales’ certainly raised a smile with one of the albums more lively tracks and shows they got a black sense of humour with this tale of living in England and supermarket queues, snooker and gardening on the telly, shit food, expensive rents and

“they love their football

they even think that English teams rule

get real”

‘Blue Murder’ is the aforementioned cover of Alistair Hulett and tells of moving to western Australia to work down the Wittenoom mine digging blue asbestos where everyday the bosses get away with the ‘Blue Murder’ of the poor sods who worked the pit. A beautifully played track with the drums keeping the beat as Andre repeats the simple but effective lines of the song.  ‘Dark Waters’ is another black song but ultimately the message is of survival. ‘Beyond The Fields’ has a celtic-rock feel to it with once again Eva’s fiddle soaring high over the music. Title track ‘The Falcon Lives’ is a slower track with great heartfelt lyrics of a long gone friend that bursts into life before dying down again.

“There’s nothing I cant take

I am too strong to break

There’s nothing I can’t be

As long as you live on in me”

‘Home’ is a re-recording of that early track with great mandolin playing from German born Uwe and is the simple tale of returning home after years away. ‘I Wonder If You’re The one (Guess I’ll Never Know)’ is another dark love story. The band combine perfect on this track with a simple tune with the emphasis on the great lyrics. ‘All I Really Need’ keeps up the darkness before ‘Any Time’ brings the album to a close with another of the album’s standout tracks. A big sound again with again the band combining well and is a great way to end things.

There really is some amazing music out there and I find it really heartening that the celtic-punk scene is producing such diverse music. Even though much more to the folkier side of things there’s plenty here to keep everyone happy. Elements of American folk sit side by side with Irish traditional music and if I had one quibble it would be that I would have liked to hear a bit of a Swiss influence in there too. Andre’s vocal style is very distinctive and if anything turns Beyond The Fields into much more of a celtic-punk band than they would be otherwise. A word here on Andre’s song writing and I have to say how refreshing it is to hear a celtic album that steers clear of all the usual celtic-punk subjects and instead opts for a different approach. Although there’s no obvious celtic themes within the songs that idea of story telling is very much there and I would recommend getting the actual CD rather than the download as those lyrics will bear repeated reading. The actual CD is an amazing digipak with an incredible 20 page booklet with band photos and the lyrics. Great stores but I do worry that Andre’s heart must have been broken a few times to keep coming up with this!

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